On this week’s All American Radio, I make the claim that the Occupy Wall Street movement, if they had their way, would strip me of my individuality and make me a cog in the system, just another member of the collective.

Think of it like being a Borg:

For those who believe my statement is over the top, fear mongering rhetoric, consider the following video by the MacIver Institute, detailing the collectivist philosophy at the root of the Occupy movement:

Here’s the video on direct democracy referenced in the above video:

It’s a pipe dream. A fantasy.

Let me give you one simple example, again from this week’s All American Radio.

The narrator of the direct democracy video repeatedly said “people should be allowed to do whatever they please, moral or immoral, as long as they do not harm another person, or another person’s possessions.” He also said all decisions would be made by consensus or majority vote.

What happens with the collective decides that having more than two children harms the collective, and you want to have more than two children? Do you still have freedom, or does the collective take priority?

The Eco-Marxists would have me pay a tax for each child that I have, because they see them not as a blessing, but as a carbon footprint.

Does my individual liberty to procreate get eliminated because there were more up twinkles than down twinkles?

You know as well as I do that the collective would reign supreme. Resistance is futile.

The video also mentions the idea of “genuine, rather than competitive innovation,” as if there would also be an elimination of the individual’s competitive spirit. As if people wouldn’t strive to create a better version of one doohickey to show they were a better engineer or artist.

And what if I did create a better doohickey? In this world, I couldn’t form a business to make a profit off of it. I guess I would have to magically create a factory powered by rainbows and fill it with robots to build these doohickeys for free so I could give them away.

But I probably wouldn’t because I’d be too busy daydreaming about when people were individuals.